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Distance:
9.6 Miles / 15.4 km
Type:
Loop
Difficulty:
Moderate
Time to Hike:
4 hours, ~48 minutes
Features:
PA Wilds
Surface Type:
Dirt
Park:
Sizerville State Park
Town:
Austin, Pennsylvania
Directions:
Emporium, PA, USA
41.599515, -78.168968
Added:
February 03, 2020
Updated:
June 26, 2020
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975 '

Total Change
1,437 '

Ascent
1,439 '

Descent

Exploring the trails at the Sizerville State Park including the blazed-yellow Bottomlands and Nady Hollow Trails. The Hiker parked at the Bucktail Path Trailhead parking area on the East Cowley Run Road and hiked on the Bottomlands Trail to the Nady Hollow Trail loop. To get to the Botttomlands Trail from the Bucktail Path Trailhead parking area, the hiker hiked a short-distance (about 1/3 of a mile) on the snowmobile trail (blazed with orange diamonds) that tracked to the west along East Branch of Cowley Run. Bottomlands Trail is an easy walk along the East Branch of the Cowley Run. The Nady Hollow Trail loop was then hiked in a clockwise route, using the Nady Hollow Connector Trail to hike to Nady Hollow. The trail along the Nady Hollow Run is a moderate walk, but more steep toward the top end of the hollow. At the top of Nady Hollow ascent turn right to stay on the Nady Hollow Trail.

The Nady Hollow connector link trail wasn't completed at the northern end which required about a 1/4 mile of bushwhacking. That part of the Nady Hollow connector link trail had the yellow blaze marked on the trees, but the foot path had not yet been established by clearing the trail of the brush and cutting the path flat on the side-hill slope. Also, some parts of the Nady Hollow Trail are extremely steep, and difficult to hike. Be careful with footing especially on the descent part of the Nady Hollow Trail. It appeared to the hiker that the Nady Hollow Connector Trail sign had been bear damaged, as the lower edge of the wood sign looked to be clawed away. The black bear claw marks are common, especially on trees and electrical poles, and are how adult Black Bear mark thier territory. 

On this hike, the hiker took a left turn at the top of Nady Hollow, to complete an out-and-back on an unmarked state forest logging road that tracks along the ridge line running northeast toward the Fox Mountain Fire Tower to the head of Ensign Run. There are a number of unmarked logging roads, in this area so caution should be used when leaving the blazed trail system within Sizerville State Park. The hiker may opt to turn right at top of Nady Hollow ascent in order to shorten the distance by eliminating the out-and-back on an unmarked state forest logging roads. The hiker may also opt to use Hemlock Road and Camprground Trail that tracks to the north through the campground areas within the Sizerville State Park, instead of hiking on the yet-to-be-completed Nady Hollow Connector Trail to hike to the bottom of Nady Hollow.

Trails
The trails hiked along this route include the East Cowley Run Road, Sizerville Snowmobile Trail, Bottomlands Trail, Hemlock Road, Nady Hollow Connector, and Nady Hollow Trail.

Length and Difficulty
The Nady Hollow Loop (Nady Hollow Connector plus the Nady Hollow Trail), without hiking the additional trails listed, is about 2-miles from end to end, including the spur trail that leads to the loop. The difficulty should still be considered moderate because of the elevation gain along the loop.

Pets
Dogs are allowed if leashed.

Camping and Backpacking
Backpackers are allowed to camp off-trail only within the Elk State Forest section of this route, which is located on the eastern side of the Nady Hollow Trail (loop). Backpackers need to follow the state forest rules and regulations for dispersed / primitive / backcountry camping.

Five (5) walk-in camping sites are avaiable within the Sizerville State Park. These walk-in sites are located at the Sizerville State Park campround area at the north end of Hemlock Road, along the West Branch of Cowley Run. These walk-in sites are for tents only and are more private than the other paved pad campsites. Backpackers can obtain a camping permit for these campsites by calling or visitng the Sizerville State Park office during business hours.

Another option for camping and hiking at this location is the Bucktail Path Trail (blazed orange), within the Elk State Forest that tracks to the south of Bucktail Path Trailhead parking area. The Bucktail Path is located in the Elk State Forest. The Bucktail Path trail is approximately 34 miles long. The Bucktail Path trail starts at Sizerville State Park and ends in the village of Sinnemahoning.

Water Source
Hikers can use water filters along the adjacent creeks along this hike. Water fountains are available within Sizerville State Park (non-winter seasons only).

Explore 88 trails near Austin, PA
  1. Parking

    41.599515, -78.168968
  2. Main Trailhead

    41.599651, -78.168938
No community routes found. To add your own hike as a Community Route for this Trail guide, leave a Trip Report with an attached GPX file.

Hazards

Ticks - Lyme Disease More Info (CDC)

Seasons

All

Blaze Color

Yellow

Photo Albums

1 Trip Report

No Star-Ratings
Write-up by:
OliverPhineas user profile picture
9.6 miles / 15.4 km
Trail added
February 03, 2020
Hiked on
January 30, 2020
Updated on
June 26, 2020

Weather Forecast

In Austin, PA

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